Views of Los Angeles from 100 Years Ago

Los Angeles in 1913 had a population of 465,000, and boasted of over 600 miles of graded and graveled streets, of its position as the commercial capital of southern California, and of its spacious homes. The following photographs are from Frank W. Staley’s Views of Los Angeles.

Weeping Willow, Echo Park

Weeping Willow, Echo Park

Residence and Park, Beverly Hills

Residence and Park, Beverly Hills

Pacific Ave and Park, House facing the sea, Long Beach

Pacific Ave and Park, Long Beach

Hollywood Residences

Hollywood Residences

Bathing Scene and Amusement Pier, Venice

Bathing Scene and Amusement Pier, Venice

Boulevard, Hollywood

Boulevard, Hollywood

Broadway, north from 8th Street

Broadway, north from 8th Street

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About Evangeline Holland

Author of Edwardian/WWI historicals. Likes cooking, the smell and collecting of old books, various artsy hobbies, travel, classic cinema, period dramas, the fusty areas of history, and all things French (though is terrible with maintaining fluency in the language). Read more about her novels and non-fiction here

3 Thoughts on “Views of Los Angeles from 100 Years Ago

  1. We absolutely HAVE to see the 1913 photos, to be able to see what the city lost (as well as gained). Look at those lovely electric trams gliding around, providing excellent public transport. Why oh why were they pulled out?

    There must have been something magical, green, hopeful and peaceful about 1913 in many places. When I wrote “Glorious Days: Australia 1913″ L.A wasn’t mentioned.. but it very easily could have been.

    Thanks for the link
    Hels
    http://melbourneblogger.blogspot.com.au/2013/12/glorious-days-australia-1913-vida.html

    • trolleyfan on December 11, 2013 at 3:21 PM said:

      “Look at those lovely electric trams gliding around, providing excellent public transport. Why oh why were they pulled out?”

      Mostly? Because they hadn’t made any actual money since, well, since those pictures were taken. And they were old and worn out (see: “Hadn’t made any money” for reason), and any time you wanted to change a route it was a major construction project rather than just drawing a new line on your schedule map. And…

      …you get the idea. I *love* the P.E. and LAry and all the other trolleys that used to go around L.A. (heck, look at my name!) – I think they’re really cool. But on the whole, they lost out to better, cheaper, faster systems – buses and cars – and essentially went bankrupt. And even when the last lines were owned by the MTA, they saw that buses did the job cheaper too.

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