Rose Maclare, Downton Abbey Christmas special

Though the popular image of 1920s fashion is that of the knee skimming, heavily fringed tubular frock, women of the decade chose a silhouette that was the complete opposite of the garçonne look: the ultra-feminine robe de style. Couturier Jeanne Lanvin, a Frenchwoman who founded her couture house in the mid-1900s, popularized the style, which was known also as a “picture dress” or “Basque dress,” and consisted of a dropped waist, a boat neckline, and an ankle-length skirt supported by panniers. Already rather exaggerated because of the panniers, couturiers took the robe de style to dizzying heights of glamor and fancy, with luxurious fabrics, beading, embroidery, and other fantastic touches. That Rose would choose the robe de style for her court presentation gown showed she was on the cutting edge of fashion, and little rebellious against the more common tubular silhouette!

Lanvin Robe de Style, 1922
Lanvin Robe de Style, 1922 – Met Museum
Lanvin Robe de Style, 1922
Lanvin Robe de Style, 1922 – Met
Robe de style panniers
Robe de style panniers
Lanvin Robe de Style, 1924
Lanvin Robe de Style, 1924 – William Vintage

The Greenwood Encyclopedia of Clothing Through American History 1900 to the Present, Volume 1 by Amy T. Peterson & Ann T. Kellogg

Related Posts with Thumbnails

Comments