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Theater

Shuffle Along: Sissle & Blake’s Broadway Hit

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The Cast of Shuffle Along, 1921
The cast of Shuffle Along (© The Broadway Collection)

Shuffle Along, Or The Making of the Musical Sensation of 1921 and All That Followe

Tickets are available for George C. Wolfe’s re-imagining of this groundbreaking musical comedy, titled Shuffle Along, Or The Making of the Musical Sensation of 1921 and All That Followed, and starring Audra MacDonald, Brian Stokes Mitchell, Billy Porter, Brandon Victor Dixon, and Joshua Henry.

Hullo, Tango! and Popular Music of 1914

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Costume design for Ethel Levy in Hello Tango by L. Bakst
Costume design for Ethel Levy in Hello Tango by L. Bakst

Perhaps the theatre community of 1914 possessed a bit of clairvoyance, for the rise of musical revues over the past two years was a harbinger for the type of glittering, American-style entertainment the Edwardians would seek during the darkest days of WWI. Hullo, Tango! followed the popular revue Hello, Ragtime! in late 1913, and broke box office records. These revues were very popular because of their large casts, glamorous sets, fantastic costumes (the costumes for Hullo, Tango! were designed by Leon Bakst), and the latest ragtime music and dances.

The revue devised by Max Pemberton and Albert de Courville. Music by Louis Hirsch; Lyrics by George Arthurs. Additional songs by Maurice Abrahams, Grant Clarke and Edgar Leslie

Cast included: Frank Carter, Isabell d’Armond, Teddie Gerard, Morris Harvey, Shirley Kellogg, Gerald Kirby, Ethel Levey, Violet Loraine, Eric Roper, Harry Tate [SOURCE]

Below is a sample of some of the songs of the revue, which also became smash records (this was, after all, the age of the gramophone too!).

Porto, the Unvanquished City

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I bring you some photographs of the city I was born in, Porto (or Oporto), in Portugal, from around the Edwardian Era. This is the second biggest city in Portugal, and one with a very rich history. It is known as the “Cidade Invicta”, or the “Unvanquished City”, for standing undefeated against many invasions.

Santa Catarina Road, circa 1875
Saint Anthony Hospital, circa 1900

 

In 1911 there were almost 190 000 people living in Porto, a city that gathered a lot of merchants and artists. Only one year before Portugal had had a revolution that put an end to the Monarchy and started the First Portuguese Republic, which would last for almost two decades.

Royal Theater of São João (St John), circa 1900

Since the city rests by the sea, its population was always very trade oriented, and it had a large bourgeois class (as opposite to Lisbon, the capital, where the nobility and the politicians lived). In the 19th century the city had a industrial revolution and turned itself into a very important hub in the Atlantic.

Lello Library, circa 1905 (still exists today)
D. Maria Bridge, circa 1877

This made it so many artists and creators of some sort went to Porto at least once. This bridge, for example, was built by Gustave Eiffel, known for the Eiffel Tower and the Statue of Liberty. This affluence turned Porto into a modern city, with a lot of caffés, theaters, bookshops, gardens, fairs, and exhibitions.

Clerigos Street, circa 1897

 

The outskirts of the city, though, were still very dedicated to agriculture (although decreasingly so). It was there that the famous Oporto wine was made, and still is, and the beverage was already one of the main trades of the city, and even the country.

Nossa Senhora da Guia Beach, circa 1900
Grand Hotel, circa 1900

 

Chinez Coffee Shop, circa 1907

And finally, some illustrations and older photographs of this quaint city by the river. I hope you liked this gallery!

Crystal Palace Museum, 1879
circa 1881
Alidos Avenue, circa 1900
Cordoaria Garden, circa 1900s